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Italian Numbers: How to Count to 1 Billion and Use Numbers in Italian (FREE Cheat-Sheet)

From sharing phone numbers, telling the time to asking the price, here's how to use numbers in Italian

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Italian Numbers - How to Count in Italian from 0 to 1 billion - PDF Download and Pronunciation
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Want to learn how to count in Italian? Learning cardinal numbers in Italian is pretty easy.

With this guide you’ll be able to correctly pronounce Italian numbers thanks to the audio snippets. Don’t miss your FREE cheat-sheet you can download to practice with!

Counting in Italian is as easy as uno, due, tre! In fact, Italian numbers share a lot of similarities with English numbers. They also follow a very simple and predictable pattern that you can learn in very little time. To make things even easier, I’ve included the audio for each number so you know exactly how to pronounce it. Plus, you can download a free PDF guide so you can practice how to count in Italian anytime you like!

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Why you NEED to learn numbers in Italian

Along with the 100 most common Italian words, knowing how to use and understand both Italian cardinal numbers and Italian cardinal numbers is a major stepping stone when learning to speak Italian. We use numbers more than you think – from telling the time, asking how much something costs, sharing your age, making a dinner reservation, jotting down phone numbers, to even understanding a Wi-Fi password. Master Italian numbers and you’ve mastered a key element of Italian conversation.

This guide includes tables and examples of Italian numbers that will teach you how to read and pronounce the numbers in Italian from one to 1 billion.

Pronti!? (Ready!?) 

Here’s how to count in Italian from zero to 1 billion. Click on the play button to hear how they’re pronounced!

Italian Cardinal Numbers

Italian Numbers 0-12

The first number is ‘zero‘, which is followed by the pronunciation shown in brackets and a play button to hear the pronunciation.

Cardinal Number Pronunciation of Italian Number Transliteration
0 zero
zdeh-roh
1 uno
oo-noh
2 due
doo-eh
3 tre
treh
4 quattro
kwah-troh
5 cinque
chin-kweh
6 sei
say
7 sette
seh-teh
8 otto
oh-toh
9 nove
noh-veh
10 dieci
dyeh-chee
11 undici
oon-dee-chee
12 dodici
doh-dee-chee

Italian Numbers - How to Count in Italian from 0 to 1 billion - Ponte Pietra in Verona at sunsetNeed help remembering Italian numbers?

When you first learn something, it can be tricky to get the ball rolling. Luckily there is a catch Italian proverb to help you the first few numbers.

Non c’è due senza tre, il quattro vien da sè.

This fun expression literally means “There’s no two without three, the four comes by itself”. This is the equivalent of English saying that things (good or bad) “always come in threes”. Stubbed your toe? Got a parking fine? Broke your phone? “Non c’è due senza tre!.

Practice counting 0-12 

Using the numbers you’ve learned above, insert them into these simple sentences to tell the time. 

  • Sono le _____ – It is 3 o’clock
  • Sono le _____ – It’s 5 o’clock
  • Sono le _____ – It’s 6 o’clock
  • Sono le _____ – It’s 12 o’clock

Italian Numbers 13-20

Now, let’s look at numbers 13 to 20 in Italian.

Cardinal Number Pronunciation of Italian Number Transliteration
13 tredici
treh-dee-chee
14 quattordici
 
kwaht-tor-dee-chee
15 quindici
 
kween-dee-chee
16 sedici
 
seh-dee-chee

Notice how the first part of the number resembles the English pattern. That is, the single-digit number comes before the ‘-teen’ part, like thirteen, fourteen and so on. The Italian equivalent of ‘teen’ is dici.  Earlier, when you learned undici (11) and dodici (12), think of these as if you were saying, one-teen and two-teen.

From 17, this pattern is reversed and dici is placed at the front.

Cardinal Number Pronunciation of Italian Number Transliteration
17 diciassette
 
dee-chahs-set-teh
18 diciotto
 
dee-choht-toh
19 diciannove
 
dee-chahn-noh-veh
20 venti
 
ven-tee

Just like in English, once you count numbers 20, 30, 40, 50… they follow their own pattern. As you will see, numbers 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90 resemble their single-digit versions. For example, 30 is trenta which looks like tre (3), and settanta looks like sette (7). The only exception is 20, which is venti.

Keep practising!
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Italian Numbers - How to Count in Italian from 0 to 1 billion - Piazza dei Signori and Italian flags in VeronaItalian numbers 21–99

The good news? You’ve already learned the trickiest numbers! Now you can apply these same rules to most of the numbers up to 99! 

Now that we are in the tens, it’s all about remembering the stem and using it to count up to the next lot of tens. For example, you learned that 20 is venti. Venti now becomes the stem that we place at the front and place the single digit after it. The only exception to this rule is with 21, 31, 41, 51… and so on. 

Here are the numbers 21 to 29 in Italian:

Cardinal Number Pronunciation of Italian Number Transliteration
21 ventuno
 
ven-too-noh
22 ventidue
 
ven-tee-doo-eh
23 ventitré
 
ven-tee-treh
24 ventiquattro
 
ven-tee-kwaht-troh
25 venticinque
 
ven-tee-cheen-kweh
26 ventisei
 
ven-tee-say
27 ventisette
 
ven-tee-seh-teh
28 ventotto
 
ven-toht-toh
29 ventinove
 
ven-tee-noh-veh

Italian sounds so beautiful because it rolls off the tongue. With that in mind, notice the i in venti is dropped in ventuno (21), and dropped again in ventotto (28) all the way up to 108 when this rule doesn’t apply. This is to ensure it rolls off the tongue easier by avoiding doubling up on vowels. Another change is the addition of the acute accent on the last vowel. Notice the tré in ventitré has an accent mark, this lets you know that the stress falls on the last syllable of this Italian number.

Here are the numbers 30 to 39 in Italian:

Cardinal Number Pronunciation of Italian Number Transliteration
30 trenta
 
tren-tah
31 trentuno
 
tren-too-noh
32 trentadue
 
tren-tah-doo-eh
33 trentatré
 
tren-tah-treh
34 trentaquattro
 
tren-tah-kwaht-troh
35 trentacinque
 
tren-tah-cheen-kweh
36 trentasei
 
tren-tah-say
37 trentasette
 
tren-tah-seh-teh
38 trentotto
 
tren-toht-toh
39 trentanove
 
tren-tah-noh-veh

Here are the numbers 40 to 49 in Italian:

Cardinal Number Pronunciation of Italian Number Transliteration
40 quaranta
 
kwah-rahn-tah
41 quarantuno
kwah-rahn-too-noh
42 quarantadue
kwah-rahn-tah-doo-eh
43 quarantatré
kwah-rahn-tah-treh
44 quarantaquattro
kwah-rahn-tah-kwaht-troh
45 quarantacinque
kwah-rahn-tah-cheen-kweh
46 quarantasei
kwah-rahn-tah-say
47 quarantasette
kwah-rahn-tah-seh-teh
48 quarantotto
kwah-rahn-toht-toh
49 quarantanove
kwah-rahn-tah-noh-veh

Here are the numbers 50 to 59 in Italian:

Cardinal Number Pronunciation of Italian Number Transliteration
50 cinquanta
cheen-kwahn-tah
51 cinquantuno
cheen-kwahn-too-noh
52 cinquantadue
cheen-kwahn-tah-doo-eh
53 cinquantatré
cheen-kwahn-tah-treh
54 cinquantaquattro
cheen-kwahn-tah-kwaht-troh
55 cinquantacinque
cheen-kwahn-tah-cheen-kweh
56 cinquantasei
cheen-kwahn-tah-say
57 cinquantasette
cheen-kwahn-tah-seh-teh
58 cinquantotto
cheen-kwahn-toht-toh
59 cinquantanove
cheen-kwahn-tah-noh-veh

Here are the numbers 60 to 69 in Italian:

Cardinal Number Pronunciation of Italian Number Transliteration
60 sessanta
ses-sahn-tah
61 sessantuno
ses-sahn-too-noh
62 sessantadue
ses-sahn-tah-doo-eh
63 sessantatré
ses-sahn-tah-treh
64 sessantaquattro
ses-sahn-tah-kwaht-troh
65 sessantacinque
ses-sahn-tah-cheen-kweh
66 sessantasei
ses-sahn-tah-say
67 sessantasette
ses-sahn-tah-seh-teh
68 sessantotto
ses-sahn-toht-toh
69 sessantanove
ses-sahn-tah-noh-veh

Here are the numbers 70 to 79 in Italian:

Cardinal Number Pronunciation of Italian Number Transliteration
70 settanta
set-tahn-tah
71 settantuno
set-tahn-too-noh
72 settantadue
set-tahn-tah-doo-eh
73 settantatré
set-tahn-tah-treh
74 settantaquattro
set-tahn-tah-kwaht-troh
75 settantacinque
set-tahn-tah-cheen-kweh
76 settantasei
set-tahn-tah-say
77 settantasette
set-tahn-tah-seh-teh
78 settantotto
set-tahn-toht-toh
79 settantanove
set-tahn-tah-noh-veh

Here are the numbers 80 to 89 in Italian:

Cardinal Number Pronunciation of Italian Number Transliteration
80 ottanta
oht-tahn-tah
81 ottantuno
oht-tahn-too-noh
82 ottantadue
oht-tahn-tah-doo-eh
83 ottantatré
oht-tahn-tah-treh
84 ottantaquattro
oht-tahn-tah-kwaht-troh
85 ottantacinque
oht-tahn-tah-cheen-kweh
86 ottantasei
oht-tahn-tah-say
87 ottantasette
oht-tahn-tah-seh-teh
88 ottantotto
oht-tahn-toht-toh
89 ottantanove
oht-tahn-tah-noh-veh

Here are the numbers 90 to 99 in Italian:

Cardinal Number Pronunciation of Italian Number Transliteration
90 novanta
noh-vahn-tah
91 novantuno
noh-vahn-too-noh
92 novantadue
noh-vahn-tah-doo-eh
93 novantatré
noh-vahn-tah-treh
94 novantaquattro
noh-vahn-tah-kwaht-troh
95 novantacinque
noh-vahn-tah-cheen-kweh
96 novantasei
noh-vahn-tah-say
97 novantasette
noh-vahn-tah-seh-teh
98 novantotto
noh-vahn-toht-toh
99 novantanove
noh-vahn-tah-noh-veh

Italian Numbers - How to Count in Italian from 0 to 1 billion - Sunset in VeronaItalian numbers 100-9,999

The word for 100 is ‘cento’. This comes from the Latin word centum, meaning “hundred”. Believe it or not, we use this in English too to denote a factor of one hundredth. For example, centimetre, century, centipede, centennial, or the suffix, percent. Once you learn cento, all you have to do is put any number you’ve learnt so far after it.

Using ‘cento’ as the stem at the front, here are the numbers 100 to 110 in Italian:

Cardinal Number Pronunciation of Italian Number Transliteration
100 cento
chen-toh
101 centuno
chen-too-noh
102 centodue
chen-toh-doo-eh
103 centotré
chen-toh-treh
104 centoquattro
chen-toh-kwaht-troh
105 centocinque
chen-toh-cheen-kweh
106 centosei
chen-toh-say
107 centosette
chen-toh-seh-teh
108 centootto
chen-toh-oh-toh
109 centonove
chen-toh-noh-veh
110 centodieci
chen-toh-dyeh-chee

 and so on…

Using ‘cento’ as the stem in the second position, here are the numbers 200 to 210 in Italian:

Cardinal Number Pronunciation of Italian Number Transliteration
200 duecento
doo-eh-chen-toh
201 duecentouno
doo-eh-chen-toh-noh
202 duecentodue
doo-eh-chen-toh-doo-eh
203 duecentotré
doo-eh-chen-toh-treh
204 duecentoquattro
doo-eh-chen-toh-kwaht-troh
205 duecentocinque
doo-eh-chen-toh-cheen-kweh
206 duecentosei
doo-eh-chen-toh-say
207 duecentosette
doo-eh-chen-toh-seh-teh
208 duecentootto
doo-eh-chen-toh-oh-toh
209 duecentonove
doo-eh-chen-toh-noh-veh
210 duecentodieci
doo-eh-chen-toh-dyeh-chee

Using this same pattern, you can count all the way up to 9,999 using ‘cento’ as the stem at the front.

Keep practising!
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Here are the numbers 300 to 900 in Italian:

Cardinal Number Pronunciation of Italian Number Transliteration
300 trecento
treh-chen-toh
400 quattrocento
kwaht-troh-chen-toh
500 cinquecento
cheen-kweh-chen-toh
600 seicento
say-chen-toh
700 settecento
set-teh-chen-toh
800 ottocento
oht-toh-chen-toh
900 novecento
noh-veh-chen-toh

Italian Numbers - How to Count in Italian from 0 to 1 billion - Piazza dei Signori and Italian flags in VeronaItalian numbers 1,000-100,000

The word for one thousand (1,000) is ‘mille‘ and just like we saw with ‘cento‘ this comes from the same Latin word mille, meaning ‘thousand’. Yup! You guessed it, we also use this same term in English in the form of the prefix ‘milli’ meaning ‘one thousandth of’. For example, millimetre, millisecond, and millilitre.

Once you learn ‘mille’, use it as the stem at the end and place any number you’ve already learnt so far after it. Notice how after 1,000, ‘mille’ becomes ‘mila‘.

Cardinal Number Pronunciation of Italian Number Transliteration
1,000 mille
meel-leh
1,001 milleuno
meel-leh-oo-noh
1,600 milleseicento
meel-leh-say-chen-toh
2,000 duemila
doo-eh-mee-lah
3,000 tremila
treh-mee-lah
4,000 quattromila
kwaht-troh-mee-lah
5,000 cinquemila
cheen-kweh-mee-lah
6,000 seimila
say-mee-lah
7,000 settemila
seh-teh-mee-lah
8,000 ottomila
oht-toh-mee-lah
9,000 novemila
noh-veh-mee-lah
10,000 diecimila
dyeh-chee-mee-lah
15,000 quindicimila
kween-dee-chee-mee-lah
100,000 centomila
chen-toh-mee-lah

Italian numbers 1 million to 1 billion

The word for one million (1,000,000) is ‘milione’ which comes from the Latin word mille plus the augmentative suffix -one. You can see this in English words such as million, or millionaire.

Once you learn ‘milione’, place any number you’ve already learnt so far after it. Notice how after one million, ‘un milione‘ becomes ‘milioni’ in the plural.

Cardinal Number Pronunciation of Italian Number Transliteration
1,000,000 un milione
oon meel-lee-oh-neh
2,000,000 due milioni
doo-eh mee-lee-oh-nee
3,000,000 tre milioni
treh mee-lee-oh-nee
4,000,000 quattro milioni
kwaht-troh mee-lee-oh-nee
5,000,000 cinque milioni
cheen-kweh mee-lee-oh-nee
6,000,000 sei milioni
say mee-lee-oh-nee
7,000,000 sette milioni
seh-teh mee-lee-oh-nee
8,000,000 otto milioni
oht-toh mee-lee-oh-nee
9,000,000 nove milioni
noh-veh mee-lee-oh-nee
10,000,000 dieci milioni
dyeh-chee mee-lee-oh-nee
1,000,000,000 un miliardo
oon mee-lee-arh-doh

To word to say one billion (1,000,000,000) is ‘un miliardo’ and the rest is history!

How to use numbers in Italians

Now that you know how to form all the numbers in Italian, let’s take a look at different scenarios in which numbers are used in everyday life.

How to give someone your phone number in Italian

Whether you want to call your hotel or invite a friend out for dinner, you’ll need to know how to give your phone number to Italians and to understand when they give you theirs.

Remember to factor in the prefisso, that is, the “country code”, “international dialling code” or  “area code”. Without this, it’s unlikely you’ll be able to make contact.  It’s important to know that Italy’s country code is +39 which in Italian is said: più trentanove.

Here are some practical examples:

  • Il prefisso dell’Australia è +61. – Australia’s country code is +61
  • Qual è il prefisso di Roma? 06 – What is Rome’s area code? 06.

When calling from a landline,  you must include the city’s area code which always starts with 0. On the other hand, an area code isn’t needed if you’re calling a smartphone in Italy.

Going shopping and saying prices in Italian

Want to pay for a gelato in Naples? Buy tickets to the Colosseum? Or buy a leather bag in Florence? Then you’ll need to know how to ask how much something is and how the response is formed. 

Here are some useful phrases to learn:

  • Quanto costa? – What’s the price? / How much does it cost?
  • Quant’è? – How much is it?
  • Quanto viene? – How much does it come to?
  • I biglietti costano venti euro e cinquanta centesimi – The tickets costs 20 euros and 50 cents.
  • Costa dodici euro – It costs 12 euros

Sometimes you’ll just hear Costa/È/Viene… followed by the price. These are all synonyms to say “It costs/It’s…”.

Talking about age and birthdays

To find out when something has or will occur, you use quando (when) and to ask when someone was born you use the verb nascere (to be born). 

  • Quando sei nata? – When were you born? (Asking a female)
  • Quando sei nato? – When were you born? (Asking a male)

To respond, you say…

  • Sono nata/o il quattro aprile millenovecento cinquantuno. – I was born April 4, 1951

To ask when someone’s birthday is, you can say:

  • Quando è il tuo compleanno? – When is your birthday?

To respond, you say…

  • (il mio compleanno è) il ventisette dicembre – (My birthday is) December 27

To find out the quantity of something, you use quanto (how much/how many) which must agree in gender and number. Expressing your age in Italian is a little different than in English because you use the verb avere (to have) + the number + anni (years). So, to ask how old someone is you say:

  • Quanti anni hai? – How old are you? (Note: quanti agrees with anni)
  • Quanti anni hanno i tuoi fratelli? – How old are your siblings?

What you’re literally asking is, ‘how many years do you have?’. To respond, you say…

  • Ho trentasei anni – I’m 36 years old (Literally, ‘I have 36 years’)
  • Mia sorella Vittoria ha 41 anni e mio fratello Paolo ha 29 anni – My sister Vittoria is 41 and my brother Paolo is 29

Telling the time in Italian

In Italy, the 24-hour clock is used much more than in English speaking countries. In fact, the 24-hour clock is always used for things such as movie times, flight times, bus and train schedules, and opening times for shops, offices, and museums.

While the 24-hour clock is the preferred choice when writing, the 12-hour clock is more common when speaking. If you’re in doubt as to if the time refers to a.m or p.m you can say di mattina (in the morning), di pomeriggio (in the afternoon) or di sera (in the evening) for added clarity. 

To ask what the time is, you can use either of the following phrases interchangeably:

  • Che ora è? – What time is it? (Literally, ‘What hour is it’?)
  • Che ore sono? – What time is it? (Literally, ‘What hours are they’?)

If the hour is singular (i.e 1 p.m., 1 a.m., midday, midnight), you answer with the singular verb. For example:

  • È l’una – It’s one o’clock. 
  • È mezzogiorno – It’s noon/midday.
  • È mezzanotte – It’s midnight.

The rest of the time you use the plural form, so è (is) changes to sono (are). For example:

  • Sono le tre – It’s three o’clock [03:00]
  • Sono le diciotto – It’s six p.m [18:00]

To say how many minutes past the hour, you simply add e (and). For example:

  • Sono le quindici e cinque – It’s five past three [15:05] (Literally, ‘It’s 15 and 5’)
  • Sono le tre e dieci – It’s ten past three [03:10] (Literally, ‘It’s 3 and 10’)
  • È l’una e venti – It’s twenty past one [01:20] (Literally, ‘It’s 1 and 20’)
  • Sono le diciannove e venticinque – It’s twenty-five past seven [19:25] (Literally, ‘It’s 19 and 25’)

To say how many minutes to the next hour you use meno (less) and the number of the next full hour. For example:

  • Sono le undici meno venticinque – It’s twenty-five to eleven (Literally, ‘It’s 11 minus 25’) [10:35]
  • Sono le undici meno venti – It’s twenty to eleven (Literally, ‘It’s 11 minus 20’) [10:40]

To express quarters and halves you say:

  • Sono le cinque e un quarto – It’s a quarter past five (Literally, ‘It’s 5 and a quarter’) [05:15]
  • Sono le cinque e mezzo – It’s half past five (Literally, ‘It’s 5 and a half) [05:30]

Want more? Get my complete guide to telling the time in Italian.

Saying the temperature in Italian 

When talking about the temperature of the weather, Italian uses the verb fare in the third person singular. For example:

  • Oggi fa trenta gradi. – Today is 30° (celsius)

Note that Italy uses degrees Celsius not Fahrenheit.

Keep practising!
Get your FREE Italian Numbers Cheat-Sheet! (Free PDF Download)

Don't let the learning stop here. Keep this guide handy by downloading my free PDF guide on How to Count in Italian from 0 to 1 billion.  Includes pronunciation tips. It's easy as uno, due, tre!

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Italian Ordinal Numbers 

When referring to the one’s address, floors in a building, or the first day of the month, you use ordinal numbers (first, second, third….). Italian ordinal numbers are adjectives, therefore they must agree in gender and number of the nouns they describe. Notice how there is nost, -rd, or -th after ordinal numbers in Italian, instead they use the degree symbol (°).

Ordinal Number Number in Italian Translation
il primo / la prima the first
il secondo / la seconda the second
il terzo / la terza the third
il quarto / la quarta the fourth
il quinto / la quinta the fifth
6° il sesto / la sesta the sixth
7° il settimo / la settima the seventh
8° l’ottavo / l’ottava the eighth
9° il nono / la nona the ninth
10° il decimo / la decima the tenth
13° il tredicesimo / la tredicesima the thirteenth
20° il ventesimo / la ventesima the twentieth
48° il quarantottesimo / la quarantottesima the forty-eighth

Once you reach il decimo (the tenth), you take the whole number, drop the final vowel, and add -esimo/a/e/i. Numbers ending in -trè and -sei retain the final vowel.

  • undici → undicesimo BUT
  • ventitré → ventitreesimo
  • trentasei → trentaseiesimo

Here are some example sentences:

  • È la seconda strada a sinistra – It’s the second street on the left.
  • Abito al sesto piano – I live on the sixth floor.

As a side note, all Italian buildings begin on the pianoterra (ground floor). So the first floor (il primo piano) corresponds to a North American second floor, the second floor (il secondo piano) corresponds to a North American third floor, e così via (and so on).

The first day of the month

Unlike in English, Italian does not use ordinal numbers when speaking about dates. For example, in English, we say ‘My birthday is the ninth of September’, but in Italian, we simply say ‘nine September’ (nove settembre).

There is, however, one exception. In Italian, only the first day of the month uses the ordinal number along with the definite article. For example:

  • Oggi è il primo novembre – Today is November first.

All other dates are expressed by using the cardinal numbers, preceded by the definite article.

  • Domani è il 3 novembre – Tomorrow is November third.

Here’s a quick recap on Italian numbers and their pronunciation so you can start practicing.

Italian Numbers - How to Count in Italian from 0 to 1 billion

Download this guide to Italian Numbers for FREE!

Keep practising!
Get your FREE Italian Numbers Cheat-Sheet! (Free PDF Download)

Don't let the learning stop here. Keep this guide handy by downloading my free PDF guide on How to Count in Italian from 0 to 1 billion.  Includes pronunciation tips. It's easy as uno, due, tre!

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Ultimate Guide to Italian Numbers - How to Count in Italian from 0 to 1 billion - PDF Download


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